Language   

Korea Blues

J.B. Lenoir
Language: English

List of versions


Related Songs

Vietnam Blues
(J.B. Lenoir)
Alabama Blues
(J.B. Lenoir)


Scritta da Lenoir nel 1951 e inclusa nell'album "Natural Man", Chess, 1970.
Sulla guerra in Corea (1950-1953).

 J.B. Lenoir
Lord I got my questionnaire, Uncle Sam's gonna send me away from here
Lord I got my questionnaire, Uncle Sam's gonna send me away from here
He said J. B. you know that I need you, Lord I need you in South Korea

Sweetheart please don't you worry, I just begin to fly in the air
Sweetheart please don't you worry, I just begin to fly in the air
Now the Chinese shoot me down, Lord I'll be in Korea somewhere

I just sittin' here wonderin', who you gonna let lay down in my bed
I just sittin' here wonderin', who you gonna let lay down in my bed
What hurt me so bad, think about some man has gone in your bed.

Contributed by Alessandro - 2006/9/13 - 12:10


A partire dalla canzone di Lenoir, un'approfondimento storico sulla guerra di Corea dall'interessante l'histgeobox, il blog tenuto da alcuni docenti di liceo francesi che ha come obiettivo di far conoscere la storia e la geografia attraverso le canzoni.

Alessandro - 2009/12/2 - 14:29



Language: French

Traduzione francese da l'histgeobox.
BLUES DE CORÉE

Mon Dieu, je viens de recevoir mon ordre d'incorporation, oncle Sam m'envoie loin d'ici
Mon Dieu, je viens de recevoir mon ordre d'incorporation, oncle Sam m'envoie loin d'ici
Il m'a dit, tu sais J.B. que j'ai besoin de toi, Dieu j'ai besoin de toi en Corée du sud

Mon amour, je t'en prie, ne t'en fais pas, je commence juste à m'élever dans les airs
Mon amour, je t'en prie, ne t'en fais pas, je commence juste à m'élever dans les airs
Maintenant les Chinois m'abattent, Dieu je serais quelque part en Corée

Je suis assis et je m'interroge, qui laisseras-tu entrer dans mon lit?
Je suis assis et je m'interroge, qui laisseras-tu entrer dans mon lit?
ce qui me mine, c'est de penser au type qui est passé dans ton lit.

Contributed by Alessandro - 2009/12/2 - 14:32


Note da : Korea Blues- J.B. Lenoir



 Korea Blues was recorded and released by Chess in 1951, as many American soldiers were dying in South Korea.
The Korea war saw a classic ‘Cold War’ dynamic where the United States intervened in South Korea after an invasion of the country a few days earlier from the North Korean communist regime, who was supported by Stalin. First referred to as a police action by the then president H.S. Truman, it was in fact, a military one. It is estimated that there were 33,686 U.S. deaths during the war.
The song is often referred to as the “Forgotten” or “Unknown” war, for the lack of public attention that it received, especially in relations to the wars that preceded (World War II) and succeeded it (Vietnam War). Lenoir was one of the few musicians to acknowledge the war in one of his songs. ‘Korean Blues’ is actually the first song about the Korean war where Chinese are mentioned. When China intervened in the war in 1950, it was a complete surprise for the U.S. military, who were not expecting this. It was the first and last time that China and U.S. went to war. Professor Robert Farley wrote “The legacies of this war remain deep, complex and underexamined. Memory of the Korean War in the United States is obscured by the looming shadows of World War II and Vietnam. China remembers the conflict differently, but China’s position in the world has changed in deep and fundamental ways since the 1950s.”
The Korean war materialised the frustration, tensions, and political interests that existed between East and West during the Cold War. Korea was simply a stage.
Written as a letter from a U.S. citizen who has just received a letter from the government to go and fight, Korean Blues carries the burden of many young men of the time. Leaving his woman behind, and killed in battle, the soldier’s main worry is who his lover will replace him with, and how she will deal with life without him.
It is a romantic song that offers the human perspective of war, and the impact it has on human life. In his book ‘The Truman and Eisenhower Blues: African-American Blues and Gospel Songs’, Guido Van Rijn talks about the message in the song “ J.B. Lenoir recorded a fatalistic song, in which death in action is combined with the specter of the Jody back home”.

Pluck - 2022/6/23 - 17:12



Main Page

Please report any error in lyrics or commentaries to antiwarsongs@gmail.com

Note for non-Italian users: Sorry, though the interface of this website is translated into English, most commentaries and biographies are in Italian and/or in other languages like French, German, Spanish, Russian etc.




hosted by inventati.org