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No Irish Need Apply

Pete Seeger


Lingua: Inglese


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[1862]
Scritta da John F. Poole.

Parecchie sono le versioni di questa canzone e, se l’originale è quello di tal John F. Poole portato al successo dal famoso attore ed ed entertainer Tony Pastor (1837-1908), la sua versione più famosa e conosciuta è quella di Pete Seeger presente in “American History in Ballad and Song, Vol.1” edito dalla Folkways Records nel 1960.

irish-need-not-apply-


Canzone molto popolare nella comunità degli immigrati irlandesi negli States e risalente alla grande ondata migratoria successiva alla Grande Fame del 1845-1852.
Il trattamento riservato dagli americani a quella massa di straccioni sporchi, affamati e malati proveniente dall’Europa all’inizio non fu certo dei più teneri… basti ricordare la scena dell’accoglienza degli irlandesi da parte dei “Nativi” di Bill "The Butcher" Cutting nel bel film di Martin Scorsese “Gangs of New York”… E sicuramente allora comparvero molti cartelli "No Irish Need Apply", così come a Torino o Milano negli anni 50 e 60 veniva esposto il classico “Non si affitta a meridionali”. Ma, come sostiene lo storico Richard Louis Jensen, la canzone creò un mito che poco ebbe veramente a che fare con la realtà. Il mercato del lavoro non discriminò significativamente gli immigrati irlandesi e, anzi, come è ben narrato pure nel film di Scorsese citato, entro breve la comunità irlandese conquistò spazi e potere grazie alla protezione accordatagli – dato l’ampio bacino elettorale che costituiva - dalla Tammany Society, l’influente lobby (solo una gang più raffinata) politico-imprenditorial-“mafiosa” da cui è nato l’attuale Partito Democratico americano…


Sung by Planxty, Chieftains, Frank Harte, Mick Moloney
I'm a decent boy just landed
From the town of Ballyfad;
I want a situation, yes,
And want it very bad.
I have seen employment advertised,
"It's just the thing," says I,
"But the dirty spalpeen ended with
'No Irish Need Apply.' "

"Whoa," says I, "that's an insult,
But to get the place I'll try,"
So I went to see the blackguard
With his "No Irish Need Apply."
Some do count it a misfortune
To be christened Pat or Dan,
But to me it is an honor
To be born an Irishman.

I started out to find the house,
I got it mighty soon;
There I found the old chap seated,
He was reading the Tribune.
I told him what I came for,
When he in a rage did fly,
"No!" he says, "You are a Paddy,
And no Irish need apply."

Then I gets my dander rising
And I'd like to black his eye
To tell an Irish gentleman
"No Irish Need Apply."
Some do count it a misfortune
To be christened Pat or Dan,
But to me it is an honor
To be born an Irishman.

I couldn't stand it longer
So a hold of him I took,
And gave him such a welting
As he'd get at Donnybrook.
He hollered, "Milia murther,"
And to get away did try,
And swore he'd never write again
"No Irish Need Apply."

Well he made a big apology,
I told him then goodbye,
Saying, "When next you want a beating,
Write `No Irish Need Apply.' "
Some do count it a misfortune
To be christened Pat or Dan,
But to me it is an honor
To be born an Irishman.

inviata da Bartleby - 21/10/2010 - 14:08




Lingua: Inglese

La versione originale scritta da John F. Poole nel 1862.
NO IRISH NEED APPLY

I'm a dacint boy, just landed from the town of Ballyfad;
I want a situation: yis, I want it mighty bad.
I saw a place advartised. It's the thing for me, says I;
But the dirty spalpeen ended with: No Irish need apply.

Whoo! says I; but that's an insult—though to get the place I'll try.
So, I wint to see the blaggar with: No Irish need apply.

I started off to find the house, I got it mighty soon;
There I found the ould chap saited: he was reading The Tribune.
I tould him what I came for, whin he in a rage did fly:
No! says he, you are a Paddy, and no Irish need apply!

Thin I felt my dandher rising, and I'd like to black his eye—
To tell an Irish Gintleman: No Irish need apply!

I couldn't stand it longer: so, a hoult of him I took,
And I gave him such a welting as he'd get at Donnybrook.
He hollered: Millia murther! and to get away did try,
And swore he'd never write again: No Irish need apply.

He made a big apology; I bid him thin good-bye,
Saying: Whin next you want a bating, add: No Irish need apply!

Sure, I've heard that in America it always is the plan
That an Irishman is just as good as any other man;
A home and hospitality they never will deny
The stranger here, or ever say: No Irish need apply.

But some black sheep are in the flock: a dirty lot, say I;
A dacint man will never write: No Irish need apply!

Sure, Paddy's heart is in his hand, as all the world does know,
His praties and his whiskey he will share with friend or foe;
His door is always open to the stranger passing by;
He never thinks of saying: None but Irish may apply.

And, in Columbia's history, his name is ranking high;
Thin, the Divil take the knaves that write: No Irish need apply!

Ould Ireland on the battle-field a lasting fame has made;
We all have heard of Meagher's men, and Corcoran's brigade.
Though fools may flout and bigots rave, and fanatics may cry,
Yet when they want good fighting-men, the Irish may apply,

And when for freedom and the right they raise the battle-cry,
Then the Rebel ranks begin to think: No Irish need apply

inviata da Bartleby - 21/10/2010 - 14:10




Lingua: Inglese

Versione “al femminile” risalente al 1863, attribuita alla cantante irlandese Kathleen O'Neil, da Mudcat Café
NO IRISH NEED APPLY

I'm a simple Irish girl and I'm looking for a place.
I've felt the grip of poverty, but sure that's no disgrace.
'Twill be long before I get one, though indeed it's hard I try,
For I read in each advertisement, "No Irish need apply."
Alas! for my poor country, which I never will deny!
How they insult us when they say, "No Irish need apply"!

Now, I wonder what's the reason that the fortune-favored few
Should throw on us that dirty slur and treat us as they do.
Sure they all know Paddy's heart is warm, and willing is his hand.
They rule us, yet we may not earn a living in their land.
O, to their sister country, how can they bread deny
By sending forth this cruel line: "No Irish need apply"?

Sure I did not do the like when they anchored on our shore.
For Irish hospitality, there's no need to deplore;
And every door is open to the weary stranger still.
Pat would give his last potato, yes, and give it with a will;
Nor whisky, which he prizes so, in any case deny.
Then wherefore do they always write, "No Irish need apply"?

Now what have they against us? Sure the world knows Paddy's brave,
For he's helped to fight their battles both on land and on the wave.
At the storming of Sebastopol, and beneath an Indian sky,
Pat raised his head, for their General said, "All Irish might apply."
Do you mind Lieutenant Morey (?), when he raised the battle cry?
Then are they not ashamed to write, "No Irish need apply"?

Then they can't deny us genius, with "Sheridan,"--"Tom Moore,"--
The late lamented "Catherine Hayes," and Sam Lover to the fore,--
Although they may laugh at our "Bulls," they cannot but admit
That Pat is always sensible, and has a ready wit;
And if they ask for Beauty, what can beat their nice black Eye?
Then is it not a shame to write, "No Irish need apply"?

Och! the French must loudly crow to find we're slighted thus,
For they can ne'er forget the blow that was dealt by one of us.
If the Iron Duke of Wellington had never drawn his sword,
Faith they might have "Napoleon Sauce" with their beef, upon my word.
They think now of their hero, dead; his name will never die.
Where will they get another such if "No Irish need apply"?

Ah! but now I'm in the land of the "Glorious" and "Free,"
And proud I am to own it, a country dear to me.
I can see by your kind faces that you will not deny
A place in your hears for Kathleen, and all Irish may apply.
Then long may the Union flourish, and ever may it be
A pattern to the world and the "Home of Liberty!"

inviata da Bartleby - 21/10/2010 - 14:11




Lingua: Inglese

Versione di Mark Westphal da Triskelle
NINA (NO IRISH NEED APPLY)

The Hunger has come and will not leave
My fair city of Newry
A better life is what I seek
for me and my family

So I come with nothing, left everything
in a coffin ship is where I've been
My parents gone, but now its over
with the lady calling us in

A place where liberty is for the rich and poor
and a man can own his own land
Where men are free and there's plenty to eat
and you don't fear the knock at your door

No Irish Need Apply
It's been a bad year
No work for you, I tell you true
So get the hell out of here

Walking the streets, I hear the babble
"Watch out ya god-damned Mic
They're dirty, lazy and breed like cattle
and they're all the Pope's Catholics"

I've checked the mills, I've checked the stores
I've checked the factories
The answers the same, it doesn't change
We've got work but none for you

No Irish Need Apply
We don't hire your kind
Now if you will, hit the hills
If you don't mind

My kin fell at Gettysburg and Antietam
The wall at Fredericksburg did not discriminate
We were all Americans when we fought
with General Meagher and the Irish Brigade

The sign on the tavern door
Said "No Dogs or Irish Served"
They hate me and I can't understand
Cause I've never been there before

No Irish Need Apply
It's been a bad year
No work for you, I tell you true
So get the hell out of here

Oh learn something, all you Know Nothings
I tell you I'm a man
I love my family, I love this country
and I'll make if I can

Oh Ireland is a sad land
with no peace or liberty
but all men are not created equal
in this land of the free

No Irish Need Apply
We don't hire your kind
Now if you will, hit the hills
If you don't mind

No Irish Need Apply
It's been a bad year
No work for you, I tell you true
So get the hell out of here

inviata da Bartleby - 21/10/2010 - 14:12




Lingua: Inglese

Versione di Tommy Makem, sull’aria della popolare “Boys from the County Cork”, dal sito dell’autore: www.makem.com
THEY TOLD US NO IRISH NEED APPLY

Just think of all the presidents who came from Irish folk
There was Wilson and Buchanan, there was Jackson, Grant and Polk
There was Cleveland and McKinley and the brave Jack Kennedy
And many more whose names have joined that goodly company

And they told us no Irish need apply!
Yes, they told us no Irish need apply!

You've heard about James Curley, that man of great renown
And Honey Fitz, who proved his worth as Mayor of Boston town
And Rose and Ted and Bob and Jack and all the Kennedy clan
And the noble John McCormack, who is honored through the land

And they told us no Irish need apply!
Yes, they told us no Irish need apply!

Did you know John Hancock's family came from the County Down?
And composer Victor Herbert, he was born in Dublin town
And the blood in Davy Crockett's veins was Irish through and through
And Connie Mack, the baseball great, well he was Irish too

And they told us no Irish need apply!
Yes, they told us no Irish need apply!

The father of the navy, John Barry was his name
He was a gallant Irishman, from Wexford town he came
To the many Irish giants in the literary field
You can add F. Scott Fitzgerald and the great Eugene O'Neill

And they told us no Irish need apply!
Yes, they told us no Irish need apply!

Whenever people talk about great service to mankind
No doubt, the name of Boston's Cardinal Cushing comes to mind
And Doctor Thomas Dooley should be leader of the van
His entire life was spent in helping out his fellow man

And they told us no Irish need apply!
Yes, they told us no Irish need apply!

In the noble art of self-defence, as you'll already know
We had men like John L. Sullivan, who never feared a foe
And gentleman Jim Corbett was among the very best
Likewise the bold Gene Tunney and Jack Dempsey and the rest

And they told us no Irish need apply!
Yes, they told us no Irish need apply!

We're the men who built the railroads, we're the men who fought the wars
We're the men who manned the police force, we're the men who drove street cars
We're the men who formed your unions, we're the men who sang your songs
We're the men who filled your history and tried to right your wrongs

And they told us no Irish need apply!
Yes, they told us no Irish need apply!

inviata da Bartleby - 21/10/2010 - 14:13




Lingua: Francese

Versione francese di Licorne da Chants pour une Irlande libre
IRLANDAIS S'ABSTENIR

Je suis un jeune homme convenable qui arrive juste
De la ville de Ballyfad;
Je veux un travail, oui,
Et je le veux vraiment.
J'ai vu un poste offert,
"C'est ce qu'il me faut," dis-je,
"Mais le sale papillon se terminait par
'Irlandais s'abstenir.' "

"Whoa," dis-je, "c'est une insulte,
Mais je vais tenter d'avoir la place,"
Je vais donc voir cette canaille
Avec son "Irlandais s'abstenir."
Pour certains c'est une malchance
D'être baptisé Pat ou Dan,
Mais pour moi c'est un honneur
D'être né Irlandais.

Je commence à chercher l'adresse,
Je la trouve vraiment vite;
Là je trouve le vieux compère assis,
En train de lire The Tribune.
Je lui dit pourquoi je viens,
Quand il s'enrage,
"Non!" dit-il, "Tu es un Paddy,
Et 'Irlandais s'abstenir'."

J'ai alors senti ma colère monter
Et j'ai voulu lui pocher un oeuil
Pour avoir dit à un gentilhomme Irlandais
"Irlandais s'abstenir."
Pour certains c'est une malchance
D'être baptisé Pat ou Dan,
Mais pour moi c'est un honneur
D'être né Irlandais.

Je ne pouvais le souffrir plus longtemps
Je l'ai alors attrapé,
Et lui ai flanqué une raclée
Comme celle qu'il aurait pris à Donnybrook.
Il braillait, "Milia murther,"
Et il a tenté de s'échapper,
Et il a juré qu'il n'écrirait plus jamais
"Irlandais s'abstenir."

Il s'est donc profondément excusé,
Je lui ai donné mon au-revoir,
En disant, "La prochaine fois que vous voudrez une raclée,
Ecrivez 'Irlandais s'abstenir.' "
Pour certains c'est une malchance
D'être baptisé Pat ou Dan,
Mais pour moi c'est un honneur
D'être né Irlandais.

inviata da Bartleby - 21/10/2010 - 14:13



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