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Acadian Driftwood

The Band
Lingue: Inglese, Francese

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Words and music by Robbie Robertson

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La lettura dell'ordine deportazione degli acadiani in un dipinto di C. W. Jefferys.
La lettura dell'ordine deportazione degli acadiani in un dipinto di C. W. Jefferys.
La canzone racconta la deportazione delle popolazioni francesi della regione dell'Acadia (che comprende le attuali province marittime del Canada,Nuova Scozia, New Brunswick, Isola del Principe Edoardo e parte del Quebec) a seguito della guerra tra Francia e Inghilterra.
Alcuni Acadiani furono costretti ad emigrare verso le colonie inglesi della costa orientale del Nordamerica, altri furono imprigionati in Inghilterra. Le famiglie furono spesso separate. Molti morirono d'epidemia o di privazioni durante l'esodo. Dopo il trattato di Parigi del 1763 alcuni acadiani partirono verso la colonia francese della Louisiana (dove diventarono i fondatori della cultura cajun) ea altri si rifugiarono in Francia, soprattutto a Belle-Île-en-Mer.


Il testo è ispirato al poema "Evangeline" di Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

È stata interpretata anche da Richard Shindell nell'album South of Delia

Riferimenti
Wikipedia

Notes by Peter Viney on Acadian Driftwood, una dettagliata analisi della canzone e della storia che racconta
The war was over and the spirit was broken
The hills were smokin' as the men withdrew
We stood on the cliffs, oh and watched the ships
Slowly sinking to their rendezvous
They signed a treaty and our homes were taken
Loved ones forsaken, they didn't give a damn
Trying to raise a family, end up the enemy
Over what went down on the plains of Abraham

Acadian driftwood
Gypsy tail wind
They call my home the land of snow
Canadian cold front movin' in
What a way to ride
Oh, what a way to go

Then some returned to the motherland
The high command had them cast away
And some stayed on to finish what they started
They never parted, they're just built that way
We had kin livin' south of the border
They're a little older and they've been around
They wrote a letter life is a whole lot better
So pull up your stakes, children and come on down

Fifteen under zero when the day became a threat
My clothes were wet and I was drenched to the bone
Been out ice fishing, too much repetition
Make a man wanna leave the only home he's known
Sailing out of the gulf headin' for Saint Pierre
Nothin' to declare, all we had was gone
Broke down along the coast, but what hurt the most
When the people there said "You better keep movin' on"

Everlasting summer filled with ill-content
This government had us walkin' in chains
This isn't my turf, this ain't my season
Can't think of one good reason to remain
I've worked in the sugar fields up from New Orleans
It was ever green up until the floods
You could call it an omen, points you where you're goin'
Set my compass north, I got winter in my blood

Acadian driftwood
Gypsy tail wind
They call my home the land of snow
Canadian cold front movin' in
What a way to ride
Oh, what a way to go

Sais tu, Acadie, j'ai le mal du pays
Ta neige, Acadie, fait des larmes au soleil
J'arrive Acadie

inviata da Lorenzo Masetti su segnalazione di marcy - 19/7/2007 - 16:42


Pagina principale CCG

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